Posts Tagged ‘Presentation Tools’

Trust in Training – The Holy Grail?

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014 by Sally Bailey<

We’ve been talking about trust a lot recently. Once the flurry of storyflows, storyboards and design concepts have died down, we’ve figured that the success of our presentation projects come down to this one simple thing – Trust.

Trust needs to be present before a client, no matter how confident they are, steps up on stage to deliver a presentation we created with them. Trust underpins the month/year/career-shifting pitch made by a nervous salesperson. Trust sits at the core of an internal presentation that communicates the need for change.

Eyeful Labs - Bubbling UnderTrust is equally important in training and coaching. It forms the backbone of any successful programme – delegates who ‘believe’ grab hold of their new skills and ideas and make the most out of them. Delegates who didn’t quite cross the threshold merely process their expenses and tidily place their course materials on the shelf next to their desk (‘shelf development’ over ‘self development’).

So how do you get it? If only it was as easy as waving a magic wand and ensuring the trust and belief of delegates but the reality is somewhat different. Trust has to be earned. There are no shortcuts or tricks of the trade – just bloody hard work.

However there maybe one exception…

Our Eyeful Labs training would seem to have an unfair advantage due to the topic in hand – presentation engagement. The quality of most presentations is, put frankly, awful – we’re typically starting from a pretty low standard in the first place. As such, by providing a simple, straightforward and logical way of improving the engagement between presenter and audience, we’re onto a winner from the word go. The very nature of the Presentation Optimisation means that improvements are obvious, discernable and repeatable.

Eyeful Labs’ combination of simplicity and process, coupled with huge (personal) leaps forward in terms of clarity and engagement means that trust is easier to win than most. The net result is that delegates are more willing to adopt Presentation Optimisation in the classroom and then have the confidence to ‘give it a go’ as part of their day to day lives, witnessing for themselves the improvements.

This trust creates a good habit that is hard to break, which is good news for presenter and audience alike. What’s not to like?

Stop Posting and Start Doing…

Friday, October 3rd, 2014 by Justine<

There’s quite a commotion online at the moment about the launch of the new Post-It App.

It’s obviously a clever piece of kit. It allows you to take photographs of up to 50 physical Post-It notes and then digitally manipulate them.

These virtual Post-Its can be pinned to your start screen, shared with collaborators and even exported to a PowerPoint, Excel of PDF format.

After reading a few excited posts about how useful it’s going to be I found myself asking a simple question ‘Why would I need to do that?’

Here at Eyeful we spend quite a lot of time encouraging our customers to step away from the tech.

Our tried and tested Presentation Optimisation methodology follows a path that begins with a pen and paper and there’s a good reason for that – it encourages you to think about stories rather than slides.

To me, the ability to write on a bunch of Post-It Notes then digitise and manipulate then seems like it might add unnecessary time and effort into what should be a simple process and is therefore an excellent way to procrastinate – and potentially not much else.

Bringing ideas to life and sharing them effectively is about identifying clear aims and objectives, adding a decent smattering of creativity and then pushing towards your desired outcome with some good old fashioned hard work.

If something will work better on paper, use paper – if it will work better on a computer, get typing. But maybe that’s where the genius of this app lies, in helping identify which creative path will work best for you.

It also seems to gel nicely with how we use tech today. When a teacher writes a homework assignment on the board some children write it down and some simply take a photo with their phone. I’m going to hazard a guess that most of us have taken photos of written information we need to remember or want to share (I personally confess to delighting in capturing weird signs and humorously worded instructions at every opportunity).

We store information in this way because it helps us ensure that the information is completely accurate and can’t fall fowl to bad hand writing or poor spelling (with the obvious exception of the aforementioned signs). It’s factual, unambiguous and easily accessed.

I can see great potential for collaboration too, although I might be a little nervous if I knew my hastily written and individually cryptic notes were going to be shared. I might even want to run a couple of them through a spellchecker before committing them to paper thus creating a process that would go something like this – computer – paper – photo – computer – before anyone else even got to see it.

Whatever you think about the app it does raise some interesting questions about how and why we communicate.

When it comes to presentations those are seemingly easy questions to answer – we use PowerPoint and we want them to buy our product. However the journey to achieving this effectively involves forgetting what you want to achieve and going back to basics to understand what your audience wants to achieve and if the Post-It app can help you achieve that, then I’m all for it.

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Windows 10 – First Impressions

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014 by Justine<

Its two years since Windows 8 was launched and having mysteriously circumnavigated Windows 9, Microsoft is now unveiling its latest offering, Windows 10.

In our review of Windows 8 we wondered aloud whether some of the changes to the look and feel were really necessary and if they would alienate existing Windows users.

That feeling of ‘change for the sake of change’ seems to have been echoed by users worldwide and is supported by some rather damning statistics only 13.4% of desktop PC’s run Windows 8.1 and that’s significantly less that the 23.9% that still run on the now unsupported Windows XP.

It does seem like Microsoft has taken this response on the chin, Windows 10 sees the return a proper Start button and familiar menu (unlike the Windows 8 upgrade that just pretended to be one).

Many people felt that Windows 8 was too skewed towards touch screen functionality and that this bias created a much lumpier, less intuitive, interface for those on traditional PC’s and Laptops – particularly business users.

Fortunately for Microsoft most of their traditional audience still exists and is still using their products, they simply didn’t bother upgrading to Windows 8. This means that Windows 10 needs to hold the attention of Windows 8 fans and be friendly enough to persuade those that haven’t upgraded that now is the time to do so. If they fail to get the balance right nobody wins.

Early signs are good, behind the return of the beloved Start button there’s a lot more going on. A new ‘Task View’ feature allows you to display all your current apps, you can create multiple desktops and view them simultaneously and you can have up to four documents or applications open on the screen at once.

It also seems that every feature and App has been given the love it needs to work seamlessly through both a touch screen and a traditional interface and they should be able to identify and adjust to your chosen interface smoothly.

For those of you who can’t wait to get your hands on Windows 10, early versions will be made available to tinkerers in the very near future.

For the rest of us it’s time to sit back and wait for those in the know to get rid of any glitches and the really patient amongst you might like to wait until 10.1 reveals where Microsoft thinks the original is weak.

As soon as we get our hands on it we’ll be sure to let you know how it performs, but until then we’re always on hand to help you whatever presentation tools and technology you’re using.

 

My Kingdom For a Phone….

Thursday, September 25th, 2014 by Justine<

My journey to work this morning was not particularly noteworthy, the weather was average, the traffic was average and none of the others drivers did anything worthy of even light swearing.

But about 30 minutes into my 40 minute commute it occurred to me that I might have left my mobile phone at home.

I don’t consider myself to be a technophile; I’m old enough to remember when you had to be in the room to see a TV programme that interested you (and there were only three channels to choose from). So I was a little nonplussed to find a panicky knot forming in my stomach at the very thought of a day without my phone, there was even a brief consideration of whether I had enough time to go back home and pick it up (despite the obvious answer being no). I eventually settled the uneasiness by convincing myself that ‘at home’ was OK – at least it wasn’t lost, or was it?*

What’s even more worrying is that I spend the whole day sitting at a desk that has on it a computer and a phone – meaning that there is literally nothing I need my mobile for.

But technology long ago passed through the era of addressing needs – now it’s all about addressing wants.

We don’t need to constantly know what the hundreds of random people (most of whom we’ve never met and never will meet) that we call ‘friends’ on social media are up to, but we certainly want to.

It seems that simply having access to technology compels us access technology.

So what’s going on? Is it obsession, addiction, dependency or something altogether more (or indeed less) sinister?

A recent experiment involved 163 students giving up their mobile phones for an hour and taking a series of anxiety tests to find out if they were affected by the deprivation.

Apparently it transpires that even those of us who don’t manage to use our phones 25 hours a day (a figure arrived at by double counting the time we’re using it for more than one thing) will suffer some level of separation anxiety.

We’ve talked before about how hard it can be to engage an audience, discussed ways of turning surreptitious phone checking to your advantage and looked at whether wearable tech will have an impact on presenters and audiences. But now it seems we’ve got far more to worry about than we thought.

Talk of creating technology free zones is already stirring up the kind of angry, civil liberty, personal freedom, type responses more often seen in relation to huge social, political and legislative change but in reality trying to enforce anything is getting harder by the day.

Twenty years ago you could have asked people to turn off their pagers, ten years ago turning off phones would have done it and five years ago it would have been phones and tablets. Today you might need to ask people to relinquish phones, tablets, glasses and smartwatches to get close to the same effect. Five years from now implantable tech might just make the whole thing completely impossible.

It doesn’t matter what you think about our reliance on technology the important thing is acknowledging that it exists and understanding how to overcome the challenges and maximise the opportunities.

We talk about how Blended Presenting can help increase audience engagement and encourage interaction but maybe soon we’ll have to start thinking more deeply about Blended Spectating to make sure our stories can be heard above the constant stream of outside information.

Whatever the future of Audience Engagement you can be sure that Eyeful will be there, innovating to our hearts content and making sure that our customers are one step ahead of their competition.

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*for any of you still bothered about the whereabouts of my phone please don’t worry my husband emailed me to say I’d left it on the kitchen table and he’s put it in the cupboard above the oven (?) just in case I get home before him!

Inside Eyeful Labs

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014 by Justine<

Just over a year ago we launched Eyeful Labs, our immersive, interactive, presentation environment, designed to help our customers explore new ways of thinking about and delivering presentations.

In that time the Labs have grown to be much more than we, or our customers, ever expected.

They have become the place where presentation innovation, creative inspiration and the spirit of exploration come together with an Eyeful dose of ‘give it a go’ (and a soupçon of scientific insanity) to explore all things presentation.

Presentations are often the least loved and most abused part of any business collateral package and Eyeful Labs is our way of changing perceptions and giving presentations the time and resource they deserve.

At first, many visitors were unsure exactly what to expect (and to be completely honest so were we). But it soon became apparent that our combination of readily accessible presentation expertise and limitless coffee was hitting the right spot.

Soon customers were experiencing the effects in the best way possible and going on to action positive change in their businesses.

Today the Labs are a real hive of activity with customers, consultants, designers and presentation enthusiasts all adding to a mix that is pushing the boundaries of what presenters and presentations can achieve.

It’s a hectic, challenging, stimulating and provocative place to be, it’s The Presentation Lab bought to life – and we love it!short reel 2

To find out how your presentation thinking can benefit from a trip to The Lab, simply get in touch and we’ll help you explore the possibilities.

 

Because We Love CPD Presentations…..

Friday, June 20th, 2014 by Justine<

We admit to being eternal tinkerers here at Eyeful, we are more than happy to put in an extra bit of effort to make sure that every customer presentation is as effective as it can be, partly because happy customers are important, but also because it bugs the life out of us when it isn’t.

But the tinkering doesn’t stop there; we just can’t help ourselves when it comes to our website either and we’re so excited about our latest round of updates that we’ve decided to release a small part of it early to give you a taste of what’s to come.

We’ll soon be launching new pages for Sales & Marketing Presentations, Event Presentations, Internal and Technical Presentations but first of all there’s loads of new stuff about our old friend, CPD Presentations.

As the only specialist presentation company that has a dedicated CPD consultant, it’s a subject that’s very close to our hearts.

We’ve long had a great relationship with RIBA and have shared our thoughts on effective CPD presentations through their website and by speaking at their events but we know that there are many more people out there struggling to hit the right balance with CPD presentations.

In the past we’ve likened getting CPD presentations right to experiencing a low flying Spitfire and lamented the lack of love that they tend to receive, and now we’ve righted some of those wrongs by giving them a whole section of our website.

We’ll keep you updated as other exciting stuff comes online but if you’d like to chat to us about CPD (or indeed any other kind of) presentations simply get in touch and we’ll be happy to demonstrate just how pernickety we can be!

Coming Soon To A Presentation Near You

Friday, June 13th, 2014 by Justine<

Gadgets, gismos, and gimmicks always keep us on our toes.

Over the years we’ve seen so many examples of presenters who fall into the ‘all the gear and no idea’ category that our excitement about new tech always comes with a certain nervousness.

Almost every week a potential presentation tool hits the shelves and it can be quite exhausting trying to keep up.

So with the first half of 2014 drawing to a close I thought it would be a good time to catch up on some of the stuff that might make an appearance in presentations in the future.

We’re all more than familiar with touchscreen technology but some clever boffins at Fujitsu believe that when we interact this way we should be able to feel more than just a flat polished surface. A prototype of their Haptic Sensory Tablet was demonstrated at the Mobile World Congress in February and promises to deliver tactile interaction.

Obviously the screen itself does not physically change to create texture but ultrasonic vibration and high pressure air are cunningly used to trick your brain into interpreting slipperiness, bumpiness and roughness that corresponds to the onscreen image.

One reviewer has described it as like being ‘a bit like being gently zapped by a rural electric fence – in a good way’ but it’s worth remembering that this is still a prototype and when refined it could be an excellent way of bringing an extra sensory element to your presentations.

3D has been edging into tech all over the place (we recently delved into the presentation potential of 3D holograms) and the first part of the year has seen two further ways in which 3D might become useful to presenters.

The crowd funded Occipital Structure Sensor attaches to an iPad and you can scan your surroundings in 3D giving you a digital image that you can then edit and manipulate. I can see this working really well when demonstrating how new machinery would fit into an already existing plant room or how a new floor covering would actually look in a room. And while the ability to do this isn’t entirely new, having the power to do the whole thing in front of a customer could be a really great way of encouraging interaction by exploring and comparing options.

3D printing has also made the transition into the mass market with the MakerBot Replicator Mini compact 3D printer providing a ‘just about’ portable way of creating objects on the spot. Many presenters like to leave something physical behind after a meeting and it’s an effective way of staying in people’s minds. Leaving behind a 3D miniature of your product, that’s been created while you chat, might well be a little more memorable than a branded pen.

What all these things have in common (along with the smelly presentations that we explored a while ago) is that they offer a chance to communicate with your audience in new ways by involving senses traditionally ignored by presentations.

Innovations like these entice presenters to put style before substance, a trap into which many have fallen (and some are still waiting to be rescued).

We love experimenting with stuff here at Eyeful and we’ve been at the forefront of encouraging presenters to utilise multi format presentations (we call it Blended Presenting) but we’ve always balanced these recommendations with one huge caveat; understand your audience first.

To find out more about Blended Presenting and how it can help you get your message across you can check out page 168 of The Presentation Lab book or simply give us a ring and we’ll be happy to help you get it right.

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So Good We’re On It Twice…

Friday, June 6th, 2014 by Justine<

Prezi have put together a handy cheat sheet for business presenters everywhere by bringing together the ‘Top 100 Online Resources Every Presenter Should See’ into one convenient list.

The great and the good of presentation innovation are all included and we’re more than a little bit chuffed to say that we made the list – twice!

Despite our obvious bias, it’s hard to deny that Prezi have searched far and wide (using both popularity data and a panel of expert judges) to create an impressive list. It includes articles, blogs, books and videos that will help every business presenter understand how to make a real impact with their audience.

Before you scuttle off through a hyperlink to find out more, you might be interested to know that you are already one step ahead of your competition, simply by reading this blog. Both this blog and The Presentation Lab book made the list and we’re really rather chuffed to be in such august company.

There are some really great names on the list including people who have inspired us to push the boundaries of presentations (and continue to keep us on our toes) so you’d be well advised explore it in more detail.

Of course, if you’ve got a presentation looming and don’t have a couple of hours to spare exploring the list for assistance, you can always get in touch and we’ll do our very best to help you.

 

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Hand Held Holograms

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014 by Justine<

Last month I postulated that maybe one day it would be possible to project a 3D Holographic image that could be used for presentations. At the time I was daydreaming about possible futures for Google Glass and if I’m honest that particular suggestion was a bit of ‘pie in the sky’ thinking.

We’ve looked at the possibility of adding 3D effects to traditional screen type presentations before and despite the tech to achieve this having been available, cheaply, for about 18 months it has singularly failed to make an impact.

We’ve also examined how immersive presentations might work and explored how smells might become part of presentations in the future. While all of this was indeed ‘quite interesting’ the 3D holographic presentation has always been something we’d love to play with (and the subject of near obsessive fervour by one Eyefulite in particular).

The technology to create and deliver 3D holograms actually exists and has been used most notably to resurrect musicians, Tupac and Michael Jackson, have both taken the stage long after taking their last breath. But like a lot of great ideas the money to make it happen came from entertainment, not business.

Technology always takes a while to become small enough and cheap enough to be usefully implemented in our everyday lives, and for 3D holograms to be a useful business communication tool they need to be portable and accessible enough to fit comfortably into the presenters armoury. The current standard rig (as used for resurrecting pop stars) is anything but portable, measuring in at 6 meters high, 4 meter deep and 4 meters wide and price wise it definitively falls into the ‘if you have to ask, you can’t afford it’ category.

The ability to project holograms from a laptop or tablet would be brilliant and it seems that, for once, technology is moving faster than our imaginations.

Ostendo technologies have just revealed the result of nine years hard work – a tic tac sized holographic projector that has been designed for installation in smart phones.

The 3D prototype has stunned early viewers and predictions are for a 2D version to be incorporated into handsets in late 2015 with the ‘Full Monty’ 3D version following shortly afterwards.

This kind of technology appearing in smart phones means it will tick all the boxes for business presenters (and make our very own Lloyd Carter a supremely happy bunny) but as we know having great tech doesn’t guarantee great presentations.

The biggest danger here will be over wowing your message.

Hollywood loves 3D holograms, almost as much as they love ludicrous coincidences, guns that never run out of ammo and things that explode for no reason. The fact that all of these things are used to fill narrative gaps and plug plot holes by distracting the audience should sound warning bells for business presenters – the last thing you want is a distracted audience.

Fortunately, if and when the new technology comes into play you can be sure that Eyeful Presentations will be able to help you make sure that it enhances your message and engages your audience rather than simply leaving them stunned and confused.

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Join us at The Presentation SuperSummit

Friday, May 9th, 2014 by Justine<

SuperSummit is a new online platform designed to allow busy professionals to attend the type of event that they’d love to have time for without ever having to leave their desks.

To celebrate their international launch they have brought together the world’s leading presentation and public speaking gurus for a Presentation SuperSummit and our MD Simon Morton will be among the illustrious speakers.

Simon will be taking attendees ‘Inside The Presentation Lab’ at 16.00 on Wednesday 14th May as part of a week long programme that includes 18 sessions all aimed at improving your presentations.

The list of speakers during the week includes: Peter Arvai, CEO & CoFounder of Prezi; one of the biggest presentation platforms with 50 million users. Amit Ranjan, CoFounder of SlideShare; the no.1 platform for users to upload and share publicly or privately, PowerPoint presentations, Word documents and Adobe PDF Portfolios. Jeremy Donovan, Group Vice President of Marketing at Gartner Inc. and author of Amazon’s no.1 bestseller “How to Deliver a TED Talk” and Bill Hoogterp, Founder of Own The Room whose clients include Sheryl Sandberg and Reid Hoffman.

Unlike a traditional summit, attendance is free and you’re able to easily cherry pick the sessions that you’d like to hear.

No transport to organise, no hotel to book and no cost means there’s no excuse not to join in….

Click here to find out more.