Posts Tagged ‘Presentation Technology’

PowerPoint And iPad Get Even Friendlier

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014 by Justine<

It’s been a few months now since PowerPoint and iPad got together after one of the longest ‘will they, won’t they?’ debacles that business presenters have ever had to endure.

After such a convoluted build up expectations were high but our initial excitement was tempered with a fair degree of disappointment. Our resident übergeek Matt Roper ran the whole thing through its paces and his review identified some annoying omissions.

Matt lamented the loss of functionality in several areas and it’s almost as if someone, somewhere was listening….

The Office for iPad 1.1 update includes some great stuff that iPad users everywhere will be really pleased to see and behind the headline about exporting to PDF there are some great presenter tools too.

The ability to play videos in PowerPoint was a particular sticking point and that issue has now been addressed (much to Matt’s relief).

The custom show issue may still be an area for concern although the news on hyperlink updates gives us a little ray of hope that everything is moving in the right direction.

Also a word of caution – while viewing a PowerPoint presentation on an iPad is now a viable (if occasionally frustrating) option; creating one is still a pipedream.

While the reasons for this are, I’m sure, deeply technical and devilishly complex, I’ll leave you with Matt’s words of wisdom on the subject “creating and designing a PPT on an iPad – that would be silly!”

Fortunately the team here at Eyeful have a number of tricks and tips up their sleeves to make sure that our customers can use their presentations in whatever format suits them , and their audience, the best – simply contact us to find out more.

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Because All Presentation Are Not The Same…

Monday, August 4th, 2014 by Justine<

When people think of presentations they tend to think of them as all being very similar in both structure and design.

Unfortunately for audiences everywhere many of the elements that began the whole furore about ‘Death by PowerPoint’ are still alive and kicking. Text heavy slides still run unchecked through boardrooms and bullet points fly freely around auditoriums while audiences try to wish themselves out of the whole sorry experience.

But thanks to the effort of the revolutionaries and reformers (ourselves included) these things are becoming rarer. Presenters now know that creating engaging, audience centric content is the way forward. Stories are all important and slides are there to support, not hinder, interactive communication.

So far, so good.

But this is no time to rest on our laurels, presentations are still failing and modern audiences have higher expectations too.

It’s time to stop concentrating on the things that all presentations need and start looking at making progress in a more specific, targeted kind of way.

Every type pf presentation has its own pitfalls and opportunities and understanding how to not just cope with, but actually take advantage of, them is the next step to presentation Nirvana.

With this in mind we’ve restructured our website to provide ‘one stop information shops’ that help our customers get straight to the heart of their subject and audience without falling into the trap of repeating past mistakes.

To find out more about any particular type of presentation simply click on the links below or give us a call on 0845 056 8528.

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Innovation from The Labs

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014 by Justine<

It’s our job to get our customers excited about their presentations and to do that, we need to get excited ourselves.

Part of that comes from the time we take to get to know our customers, their businesses and their audiences and part of it comes from our natural (and slightly odd) tendency to get excited by presentations as a whole. The last (and perhaps most important) part comes from the time we take to let our minds wander off on any available presentation tangent and then tinker incessantly until we can bring our visions to life.

Until recently this process has taken place in a largely secretive way with our experts grabbing a few minutes between customer projects to fiddle about and see what they can come up with. While this process wasn’t nearly as grubby as I’ve just made it sound, we thought it was time to make the whole thing a little more proper.

So we set aside some time in the Labs for our dreamers and visionaries to bounce ideas off each other and then we gave them the opportunity to go forth and see what they could produce.

It’s fair to say that the whole endeavour is turning out to be a rather good idea, a room full of presentation enthusiast firing on all cylinders is truly something to behold and some of the mad ideas that have been batted around have turned into really interesting stuff – so much so that we’ve decided to dedicate a new page on our website to showcase the results.

The Innovation page forms an integral part of our latest web update (more of which I’ll be blogging about later in the week) and we’ll be updating the content every few months, so don’t forget to check back.

blog inn(Please note that neither Eyeful Presentation nor any of its employees or associates bears any responsibility for cessation of productivity and/or addiction brought about by the playing of Lil Phil – you have been warned!)

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Inside Eyeful Labs

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014 by Justine<

Just over a year ago we launched Eyeful Labs, our immersive, interactive, presentation environment, designed to help our customers explore new ways of thinking about and delivering presentations.

In that time the Labs have grown to be much more than we, or our customers, ever expected.

They have become the place where presentation innovation, creative inspiration and the spirit of exploration come together with an Eyeful dose of ‘give it a go’ (and a soupçon of scientific insanity) to explore all things presentation.

Presentations are often the least loved and most abused part of any business collateral package and Eyeful Labs is our way of changing perceptions and giving presentations the time and resource they deserve.

At first, many visitors were unsure exactly what to expect (and to be completely honest so were we). But it soon became apparent that our combination of readily accessible presentation expertise and limitless coffee was hitting the right spot.

Soon customers were experiencing the effects in the best way possible and going on to action positive change in their businesses.

Today the Labs are a real hive of activity with customers, consultants, designers and presentation enthusiasts all adding to a mix that is pushing the boundaries of what presenters and presentations can achieve.

It’s a hectic, challenging, stimulating and provocative place to be, it’s The Presentation Lab bought to life – and we love it!short reel 2

To find out how your presentation thinking can benefit from a trip to The Lab, simply get in touch and we’ll help you explore the possibilities.

 

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Coming Soon To A Presentation Near You

Friday, June 13th, 2014 by Justine<

Gadgets, gismos, and gimmicks always keep us on our toes.

Over the years we’ve seen so many examples of presenters who fall into the ‘all the gear and no idea’ category that our excitement about new tech always comes with a certain nervousness.

Almost every week a potential presentation tool hits the shelves and it can be quite exhausting trying to keep up.

So with the first half of 2014 drawing to a close I thought it would be a good time to catch up on some of the stuff that might make an appearance in presentations in the future.

We’re all more than familiar with touchscreen technology but some clever boffins at Fujitsu believe that when we interact this way we should be able to feel more than just a flat polished surface. A prototype of their Haptic Sensory Tablet was demonstrated at the Mobile World Congress in February and promises to deliver tactile interaction.

Obviously the screen itself does not physically change to create texture but ultrasonic vibration and high pressure air are cunningly used to trick your brain into interpreting slipperiness, bumpiness and roughness that corresponds to the onscreen image.

One reviewer has described it as like being ‘a bit like being gently zapped by a rural electric fence – in a good way’ but it’s worth remembering that this is still a prototype and when refined it could be an excellent way of bringing an extra sensory element to your presentations.

3D has been edging into tech all over the place (we recently delved into the presentation potential of 3D holograms) and the first part of the year has seen two further ways in which 3D might become useful to presenters.

The crowd funded Occipital Structure Sensor attaches to an iPad and you can scan your surroundings in 3D giving you a digital image that you can then edit and manipulate. I can see this working really well when demonstrating how new machinery would fit into an already existing plant room or how a new floor covering would actually look in a room. And while the ability to do this isn’t entirely new, having the power to do the whole thing in front of a customer could be a really great way of encouraging interaction by exploring and comparing options.

3D printing has also made the transition into the mass market with the MakerBot Replicator Mini compact 3D printer providing a ‘just about’ portable way of creating objects on the spot. Many presenters like to leave something physical behind after a meeting and it’s an effective way of staying in people’s minds. Leaving behind a 3D miniature of your product, that’s been created while you chat, might well be a little more memorable than a branded pen.

What all these things have in common (along with the smelly presentations that we explored a while ago) is that they offer a chance to communicate with your audience in new ways by involving senses traditionally ignored by presentations.

Innovations like these entice presenters to put style before substance, a trap into which many have fallen (and some are still waiting to be rescued).

We love experimenting with stuff here at Eyeful and we’ve been at the forefront of encouraging presenters to utilise multi format presentations (we call it Blended Presenting) but we’ve always balanced these recommendations with one huge caveat; understand your audience first.

To find out more about Blended Presenting and how it can help you get your message across you can check out page 168 of The Presentation Lab book or simply give us a ring and we’ll be happy to help you get it right.

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Hand Held Holograms

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014 by Justine<

Last month I postulated that maybe one day it would be possible to project a 3D Holographic image that could be used for presentations. At the time I was daydreaming about possible futures for Google Glass and if I’m honest that particular suggestion was a bit of ‘pie in the sky’ thinking.

We’ve looked at the possibility of adding 3D effects to traditional screen type presentations before and despite the tech to achieve this having been available, cheaply, for about 18 months it has singularly failed to make an impact.

We’ve also examined how immersive presentations might work and explored how smells might become part of presentations in the future. While all of this was indeed ‘quite interesting’ the 3D holographic presentation has always been something we’d love to play with (and the subject of near obsessive fervour by one Eyefulite in particular).

The technology to create and deliver 3D holograms actually exists and has been used most notably to resurrect musicians, Tupac and Michael Jackson, have both taken the stage long after taking their last breath. But like a lot of great ideas the money to make it happen came from entertainment, not business.

Technology always takes a while to become small enough and cheap enough to be usefully implemented in our everyday lives, and for 3D holograms to be a useful business communication tool they need to be portable and accessible enough to fit comfortably into the presenters armoury. The current standard rig (as used for resurrecting pop stars) is anything but portable, measuring in at 6 meters high, 4 meter deep and 4 meters wide and price wise it definitively falls into the ‘if you have to ask, you can’t afford it’ category.

The ability to project holograms from a laptop or tablet would be brilliant and it seems that, for once, technology is moving faster than our imaginations.

Ostendo technologies have just revealed the result of nine years hard work – a tic tac sized holographic projector that has been designed for installation in smart phones.

The 3D prototype has stunned early viewers and predictions are for a 2D version to be incorporated into handsets in late 2015 with the ‘Full Monty’ 3D version following shortly afterwards.

This kind of technology appearing in smart phones means it will tick all the boxes for business presenters (and make our very own Lloyd Carter a supremely happy bunny) but as we know having great tech doesn’t guarantee great presentations.

The biggest danger here will be over wowing your message.

Hollywood loves 3D holograms, almost as much as they love ludicrous coincidences, guns that never run out of ammo and things that explode for no reason. The fact that all of these things are used to fill narrative gaps and plug plot holes by distracting the audience should sound warning bells for business presenters – the last thing you want is a distracted audience.

Fortunately, if and when the new technology comes into play you can be sure that Eyeful Presentations will be able to help you make sure that it enhances your message and engages your audience rather than simply leaving them stunned and confused.

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PowerPoint for iPad – The Übergeek Review

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014 by Matt<

A wise man (I think he was wise anyway) once said the problem with the iPad is that Apple made a big iPhone rather than a small Mac. Unfortunately I think he was right.

Now I’m a PC man, I don’t own a MAC and quite frankly if you put me in front of one I’d have trouble finding the on button. But I am Apple gadget mad, I have an iPod Touch, iPhone 5 and an iPad 4 – so I know my around these devices pretty damn well. I like to explore new quirky useful apps, for example I recently turned my iPad into a touchpad remote control mouse and keyboard for my Laptop which was connected to my home TV. So I think I qualify as something of a geek.

When I heard PowerPoint for iPad was going to be released, I should have been jumping for joy and chomping at the bit to get my hands on it and have a play.

But – I’ve been here before. With this app or that app claiming to be the one to truly put an Eyeful designed PowerPoint in all its glory on the iPad only to fail time after time. The closest we’ve got is through some software called iSpring. And by close I mean 96% (my official guesstimate!) to the user experience being truly replicated on the iPad to the level it is on a PC.

Then a couple of days ago, I finally got my hands on the official Microsoft PowerPoint for iPad app and, well, it’s not all bad, but it’s not all great either!

Let’s start at the beginning.

You have just received your lovingly created PowerPoint Presentation from Eyeful, it’s all there, the message is strong, design is sleek and the animation artfully carries your story through to its conclusion…

And there you are, with a piece of collateral ready for a formal one-to-many presentation. But as we’ve preached many times, that same collateral can be reutilised and used on mobile devices. Cue the calls to put the deck on the iPads ready for next week’s marketing event.

And why not? An interactive presentation on a booth at an event, is a great way for interested people to have a play and find out what your business is all about.

An iPad is a also a powerful informal sales tool for when you step into that 1-2-1 pitch meeting and really need to get across why you are the BEST!

So, surely whacking the PowerPoint file onto the iPad is easy right? WRONG!

It’s a right palaver, but it’s getting better. And due credit to Microsoft for finally getting this app released. Well as much credit as you can give someone for turning up to the party 4 years after it started!!

You have three options to get the file onto the iPad. Firstly, the easiest and simplest method is OneDrive – Microsoft’s free cloud based hard drive. Simply drop the file onto your OneDrive account on your PC and a few minutes later it will be available to download onto your iPad, assuming you have the OneDrive app installed on your iPad. Filesize and internet speed will determine how long this process takes.

Second up and also pretty simple is via email, simply email the file to yourself. The usual file size restrictions apply. So this would rule out a lot of the presentations we create.

And finally, the most convoluted, but possibly quickest solution if your file is pretty beefy is via USB cable and some third party software called File App, which is a bit fiddly at first, but is a really useful piece of software for exploring the inner workings of your iPad.

So, one way or another you now have your Eyeful presentation on your iPad. So far so good, but how does it playback?

This is usually where the apps have fallen down over the years. In the past there have been text spilling everywhere, shapes and images suddenly in the wrong place and a lack of animation that simply put, you may as well have just converted it to PDF and not bothered.

Well, I put the app through its paces with a lovely presentation we designed that features a host of features including great design and use of images, demanding slick animation, custom shows, hyperlinks to external websites and embedded video.

And I was pleasantly surprised on hitting play, as the presentation sprang into life in a smooth and sophisticated way, the animation played smoothly, no glitches were obvious and it all felt pretty solid. A simple swipe took me through the first slides and it was like viewing a PowerPoint on a PC – it was working!!!

But then, the first fail, an embedded video sat static and no amount of tapping, pressing and holding or shaking of the iPad would get it to play. GUTTED. It was all going so well.

Then onto a slide with custom show hyperlinks which gave me the option to view some hidden slides – which failed. The custom show links were deader than VHS technology…

I skipped on through the rest of the presentation and to the apps credit the only problems I saw were the two noted above, they were pretty big problems though.

But if, like the majority of Eyefuls presentations, yours doesn’t contain custom shows or videos then this is a pretty robust solution for playing presentations on iPads. And there is some further good news, the app does support hyperlinking from slide to slide and hyperlinking to external websites…

So the custom show route can be worked around. And so long as you don’t mind requiring a live internet connection, then the videos could be hosted online and streamed outside of the presentation. Get stuck in slow internet area though and expect the video to buffer.

Speaking of internet connections, further good news… when you initially add the presentation file to the iPad it stays on the hard drive of the device, meaning you don’t need to be connected to the internet for playback. An absolutely critical box ticked.

So, all in all, it’s not a perfect iPad  solution – but there is enough capability there to make the PowerPoint for iPad app a viable presentation playback solution.

In terms of editing and creation, the word fiddly doesn’t come close. Whilst a lot of functionality is there, a lot isn’t. Making it pretty pointless in an age where your sole piece of hardware isn’t going to be an iPad.  It’s far easier to create and edit on a proper PC or Mac.

The most I would be comfortable doing would be tweaking textboxes and changing colours of objects. Changing images without breaking animation sequences isn’t an option. In fact adding or amending animation in the app isn’t supported. Strangely enough though, if animation is already present (having been added during creation on PC) then this displays perfectly. Good, but strange!

And there you go the PowerPoint for iPad app is finally here. Right now it’s not perfect and it did turn up 4 years late. So all in all, depending on the project it could be the perfect iPad solution. But without video, custom shows and animation it just feels like it’s only part of the PowerPoint package. So, all things considered, this Übergeek scores it 6/10, Microsoft must try harder.

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Google Glass – For One Day Only

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014 by Justine<

Todays the day that techies in the US get a chance to find out whether wearable tech has a future in the real world as Google release some of their super specs to paying customers.

Google Glass is officially still in development but for one day only, over 18’s in the US with a healthy bank balance, a little bit of luck (and the ability to fill in a form) can get their hands on a pair to find out for themselves what all the fuss is about.

Google have been really clever in creating a buzz about the giving people chance to pay handsomely to become part of what is basically a market research exercise, but aside from that, what can wearable tech bring to business and will it be changing the presentation landscape?

Technology journalist have had their hands on it for a little while now and the results of their endeavours range from enthusiastic to bemused and if nothing else it’s given us a great insight into their daily lives.

Currently concerns seem to centre less around functionality and more around looking a bit of an idiot when you wear them and the social reaction that they can provoke.

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Socially the potential of the technology is controversial, anyone wearing them will (eventually) be able to record and/or live stream everything they see and use functionality such as face recognition to summon up all the web information that’s available on anyone they see. Google have not been shy in acknowledging that their glasses need to be worn responsibly for people to avoid becoming ‘Glassholes’.

At the moment it’s quite easy to spot wearers (unless they’re socialising with Star Trek extras in full make up) but we all know that Moore’s Law holds true throughout technology and it won’t be long before we can’t even tell who’s connected and who isn’t, especially if they swop the voice activation for optical tracking.

There’s no question that the functionality they will eventually provide can enhance the wearers experience it’s going to be in identifying when it is, and isn’t, appropriate to wear them that will provide the real challenges.

So what about business?

As we’ve discussed before the way people do business is changing, formal meetings have given way to informal conversations and deals are done without people ever meeting, but the one thing that remains the same is the trust needed to build business relationships. People do business with people, and the way those people interact makes a difference to the outcome.

We’ll all admit that the first thing we do when we hear from a potential customer is type their name and the name of their company into a search engine to find out more. Where are they based? What do they do? How big are they? What kind of culture do they have? These are all questions that will help us work more efficiently with them. But that search will occasionally throw up something else, a derogatory blog, disparaging review or a facebook image of them after one too many cocktails for example. And it might just be me, but sitting across the room from them while they do this through their glasses feels a bit raw, like a root canal without the anaesthetic. And if I’m doing the same there may well be an air of internet jousting that doesn’t feel like the basis for a great working relationship.

So far the whole thing feels a little alien and it should, because having access to vast swathes of information about everyone you meet and everything you see in real time is, if we’re honest, a little weird, we’re human beings and we rely on intangibles like instincts and experience to help us decide what and who we like.

But it’s not all big brother doom and gloom.

The ability to share your presentation (or more probably parts of it) with people as part of an organic conversation is important in modern business communication and with Google Glass you can do that, and although passing your specs to them reeks a little of primary school tomfoolery it’s certainly going to be something they remember.

And as the technology progresses there will be new ways to allow them access to your presentation, wifi transfer from your glasses to theirs for example. Or maybe one day your glasses will be able to project a 3D presentation onto a table top in the ubiquitous departure lounge and maybe (if you’re really lucky) no one will say Help me Obi-Wan Kanobi, you’re my only hope……

No one really knows where this technology will go and whether it will become the equivalent of a laserdisc or a smartphone, but here at Eyeful we’re always on the lookout for ways to help our customers present, and communicate, more effectively so you can be sure that we’ll be among the first to tap into its potential.

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The Presentation Lab Launch – The Video

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014 by Justine<

Monday 31st March saw The Presentation Lab book released in the US and never ones to miss an opportunity for cake we had a little shindig to celebrate.

Lots of our friends and presentation enthusiasts from around the globe tuned in live to find out what all the fuss was about and industry experts shared their thoughts on the future of presentations.

The event proved much more popular than we expected and we’re still receiving registrations, so what about all those people who missed the event?

Fortunately for you, we’re all about keeping our customers happy so we’ve decided to share a recording of the event for those who missed out on the live feed.

After the main event we hosted a live twitter Q&A where one of our guests perfectly summed up initial reactions to the book….

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The Presentation Lab: Learn the Formula Behind Powerful Presentations is available from all good booksellers ISBN-13: 978-1118687000

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Office for iPad est arrivé

Friday, March 28th, 2014 by Justine<

You may like to sit down for this one.

After four years of turmoil and less than ten days after our last hopeful speculation about rumour becoming reality, it’s actually happened…. Take a deep breath everyone – Office for iPad exists!

PowerPoint and iPad have finally said “I do” and we couldn’t be more excited.

For those of us who are passionate about presentations and get a little giddy about gadgets the world just became a better place.

Tempting as it is to wax lyrical about how much of an impact this will have on business presentations and what it means for effective communications in the ever changing presentation landscape, I’m going to cut this one short.

You could spend the next few minutes sharing my excitement or reading what the tech experts have to say, but the best thing you can do right now is get downloading.

PS Now the hardware/software challenge has been sorted, it might well be time to give a little thought to the presentations themselves and we’re just the people who can help!

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