Posts Tagged ‘Presentation Skills’

Selling With Stories

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013 by Justine<

Nestled between the excitement of holidays and the anticipation of Christmas, autumn is a challenging time of year for sales teams everywhere. It’s hard to keep up the enthusiasm as the nights draw in and the leaves begin falling – but there’s still work to be done, and targets to be met.

Webinar logoMany of you will be about to embark on the annual trawl through the lost opportunities of spring but before you pick up the phone it’s time to review why they were lost in the first place and what new offering you have for them. Maybe they have decided to defer their investment until next year or maybe you just failed to make a connection, and if you couldn’t connect in spring, how will you connect in autumn?

Many sales teams will have been using the same collateral for almost a year and that’s a long time in business. Products and services change and evolve constantly and your customers’ needs and expectations do too.

Here at Eyeful we know that making your sales team achieve that final push is easier than you might think, all it takes to breathe new life into lagging sales is a little fresh thinking.

With this in mind we’ve put together an autumnal update webinar designed to breathe new life into sales teams everywhere.

We’ll help you understand your audience better, reinvigorate your sales, explain why slides are out and stories are in and give you all the tips you’ll need to communicate effectively anytime, anyplace, anywhere.

It’s not about airy fairy strategies and fanciful ideas, it’s about the stuff that works and brings real results.

It’s free to attend simply click through the links below to register and we’ll help you make those sales.

September 30th 12.00 GMT

September 30th 17.00 GMT

Blended Presenting – The Webinar

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013 by Justine<

On Wednesday September 18th at 16.00 GMT our esteemed leader, Mr Simon Morton, will be teaming up with our friends at Brainshark to tell the world about how our Blended Presenting methodology is changing presentation delivery.

The way business is done has changed, business interactions are often less formal than the traditional board room or seminar, but every opportunity still involves presenting. Getting the balance right and ensuring that you get your message across every time is about embracing new skills and technologies and then learning to use them appropriately.

The key to success is having a strong, engaging story and then conveying it to your audience in a way that resonates with them.

Much of our methodology resolves around good old common sense, trying to present to 50 people on an iPad is a fool’s errand, but Blended Presenting has a little more magic to it than that.

Simon will be sharing a little Eyeful love with all the attendees, giving them the insights that make the difference between giving a presentation and making a real impression.

To register simply click through this link.

Eyeful Training – Our Attendees Tell It How It Is

Friday, August 9th, 2013 by Justine<

Here at Eyeful we believe that the only way to find out if something is any good is to ask.

So we quizzed recent attendees of one of our’ Creating Effective Presentations’ training sessions to see what they thought – and here’s what they said…

“Compared to other training it was one of the better and more effective ones I have received. I have taken away a great deal of understanding and knowledge from this course that I believe will help me a great deal in future client presentations. The trainers on the course were exceedingly well versed in their presentation skills and they had a great deal of experience which really shone through in their delivery. They spoke passionately about their fields of expertise, which is essential in capturing the attention and imagination of the participants.”

“It was really interactive, which made it more engaging and memorable.”

“The course gave a great overview of creating an effective presentation.”

“The course made me realise that it’s one thing to create an engaging presentation and another to be able to stand there and deliver it.”

“Definitely – I wish I had this kind of training when I was at university, students and even lecturers would really benefit. I think most people would benefit from this workshop, especially people who often have to deliver client facing presentations.”

“I would recommend this to anyone that works with PowerPoint on a regular basis.”

“Very good, the trainers were friendly and easily approachable.”

“I felt the emphasis on knowing your story, before you even open PowerPoint, was a very strong. It cemented the fact that PowerPoint is the tool and not the most important part of a presentation.”

“I really enjoyed the design elements of the work shop as I’m sure for most other people did, too. Just some shortcuts that we learnt and some of the tools available in PP that I wasn’t aware of are really going to be handy in ensuring we save time whilst creating PPs and making the finished product look a lot more professional. Some of the points in the more theoretical elements of the training were quite obvious if you think about it but the way that they were delivered made it very memorable and ensured that the key take-away was that the content of a presentation is the most important part, which a lot of people forget as they get caught up in design.”

Not only that but all the attendees agreed that the session was informative and most of then found it enjoyable too.

If you’re interested in how our training can help you get more from your presentations you can read all about what training we offer or cut to the chase and drop us a line.

Lessons From Spam

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013 by Justine<

(In which we will be considering the delights of both meat and email based varieties – and yes, I did say delights.)

As I child of the 70’s I know that Spam (the meat product) has its place in the world. It can contribute to an acceptable sandwich and make an interesting fritter, it sits in the back of the cupboard patiently waiting for a skint month in the certain knowledge that its time will come. But let’s be honest the one thing it’s really good at is reminding us that not every meat based meal is Sunday dinner.

As someone who spends a lot of time at a computer I know that Spam (the email kind) serves a similar purpose. It sits in your inbox until the need for procrastination arises, it tells you what people you never knew you cared about are up to and it occasionally invites you to something you’d quite like to attend. But, in line with its comestible counterpart, the main thing it’s really good at is reminding you that not all communication is effective.

A recent gem was a master class in the art of the verbose: Do I, it asked, wish to attend a webinar to ‘discover a pragmatic way to uncover the customer buying process or “sales motion” and connect it with the intentions and actions of the go-to-market teams to eliminate execution gaps.’  I’ve read it a few times now and I still don’t know, mostly because I don’t understand the question.

When we start to consider that emails are supposed to capture their audiences’ attention quickly and get their message across before the recipient can hit ‘delete’ the whole thing becomes even scarier.

Presentation audiences are not armed with a delete button and it’s every presenter’s job to ensure that their audience is not trying to wish one into existence. People need to understand to be engaged.

If you’re product or service will save people time and money by helping them work more efficiently then tell them how and why. Don’t pretend it’s ‘an holistic approach to the betterfication of the cost-production-retail analysis in line with an overarching efficiency framework’ because they’ll know that’s complete rubbish and they’ll presume that your product is too.

The Plain English Campaign has a brilliant gobbledegook generator on their website, today it gave me this gem of business speak ‘It’s time that we became uber-efficient with our ambient digital innovation.’ Which would have been funny, if only I could have escaped the eerie feeling that I’ve read it somewhere before….?

spam

Your Amazing Audience

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013 by Justine<

We are well aware that we could be accused of ‘banging on a bit’ when it comes to your audience but not only are we unapologetic, we’re not going to stop either.

It’s important to know why your audience get bored and what you can do about it, and it’s important to engage them, but that’s not all you need to worry about. Your audience is armed with the most advanced tech possible – the Human brain and that means they’re clever enough to (mis)understand things in a phenomenal way.

For example 55% of people are able to read this

words

And an even larger percentage can make sense of this

 words 2

 

Amazing as this is, you need your audience to understand your message, not a message their brain interpreted from your presentation.

Knowing your audience is the key to clear communication, you need to tell them a story that interests them, pitch facts and figures appropriately and deliver your presentation in a way that connects with them.

If you don’t there’s no guessing what their brains will take away…..

 

And the nominees are…….Eyeful Presentations

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013 by Justine<

Excitement is in the air here at Eyeful.

We are absolutely delighted to have been shortlisted for the Nectar Business Awards 2013 – Small Business of the Year award.

Without sounding twee, it really is an honour to be get this far.

We’re up against some of the brightest and best that the UK can offer and we’re crossing all available appendages as we wait for the result.

Here’s the shortlist in full:

Eyeful Presentations

Goody Good Stuff

PetShopBowl.co.uk

Rock ‘N’ Rose

Wold Top Brewery

Firestar Toys Ltd

Whatever happens we think this list would make for a fantastic party…..

Nectar Logo

Calling All Whistleblowers….

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013 by Justine<

The recent leaking of NSA presentations has got us scratching our heads here at Eyeful Towers.

Poor Presentation causes International Incident’ is not a headline we ever expected to see, yet it’s actually happening…..

Online Espionage aside, we were wondering just how bad presentations can be, and decided it was time to give a voice to all those who have suffered in silence.

So as Edward Snowden continues his search for exile in far flung corners of the globe we’re offering you the opportunity to whistle blow without incurring any airfares.

Simply click through this link and tell us about the worst presentation you’ve ever seen. You don’t have to name names if you don’t want to, we’re interested in the crime not the criminal. Just tell us what made the presentation so bad and we’ll try to set the world to rights on your behalf.

If you’re unsure on what makes a bad presentation, or you’re unfortunate enough to have never seen a good one, take a peek at our 10 commandments below to see what’s what.

As if saving you the trouble of planning an escape route wasn’t enough, we’ll pick one of you out of the hat to receive some chocs and flowers as a thank-you.

Picture1

It’s all in the commentary

Friday, June 21st, 2013 by Justine<

This week I have been carefully considering the art of commentary.

When the news about Murray Walkers illness hit the airwaves I found myself reminiscing for the glory days of F1.

Don’t get me wrong there is still something very magical about it – the speed and the cutting edge engineering are thrilling and the cars make a noise that you can hear in your sternum. I spent my childhood following my Dad round as he marshalled at UK race tracks in the 70’s and 80’s (until Ayrton Senna ran him over, but that’s another story). I still have my Junior Marshall pit pass and overalls. I was an F1 fanatic, but F1 seemed to have more personality back then, and no one captured that better than Murray.

Murray Walker is a great commentator because he is a great fan, enthusiasm on that level is impossible to fake. His commentary style was not always entirely accurate or factual but we forgave him, because he drew us in and made us invest in the story unfolding before us, his enthusiasm became ours.

Right now I’m looking forward to the Le Mans 24 hour race. On quite a few occasions in the past it has been broadcast live, in its entirety, possibly the toughest commentary challenge that there is. This requires a team of commentators, who largely do a fantastic job, but there are challenges. Firstly, not even those spectators who actually made the journey to the circuit watch the whole race – there’s a fairground, a bar and a campsite for them to frequent. Secondly it’s quite hard to even see what’s going on at night, never mind talk about it.

Those that get to fill the early hours of the morning give some of the most interesting commentary you’ll never hear. I know this because in 2002 I took it upon myself to watch the whole thing. At approx 3am the commentator was chatting about the British driver Perry McCarthy, in the brief bio that he was using to fill time, he included the fact that Perry was also The Stig on Top Gear. Now as we know later revelations of this nature created a multi-media circus and legal action. So what happened in 2002? Apart from it waking me up a bit, nothing. It wasn’t until January 2003 that his secret Stigness was revealed in the papers.

Television commentating is much like presenting slides – it involves talking about things that the audience can already see for themselves and it requires some similar skills. Murray is a fantastic commentator because he cares about the subject and because he is himself. As for the early morning Le Mans commentator, he just proves that you can say anything you want if no-one’s listening….

Get Well Soon Murray

The blog, of the blog, of the book….

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013 by Justine<

We’ve always been big on sharing here at Eyeful.

You’ve seen the website, received the newsletter and enjoyed the blog, the luckiest amongst you are armed with an Optimised Presentation and pretty soon you’ll all be able to read the book.

Simon has finally been persuaded to try and trap his wit and wisdom between the covers of an actual book. No really, it’s true, it’s got an ISBN number and everything….

The Presentation Lab: Learn The Formula Behind Powerful Presentations can be yours to own later this year, but there’s no need to wait for Christmas to see what it’s all about.

As if the prospect of writing a book were not daunting enough, Simon is throwing open the creative process for everyone to see how it evolves.

He will be sharing the agony and ecstasy of the writing process through dedicated blog and Twitter feeds.

We can’t promise that it’ll always be plain sailing, and it may need a parental guidance sticker at times, but it is guaranteed to be interesting!

The blog and Twitter feeds will allow you to experience the kind of DVD extras not usually associated with book writing (and somewhere along the way we may discover a reason for this…) – enjoy!

lab2

 

 

 

Dragons Den – Backstage Report Part 1

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013 by Justine<

Yesterday saw Simon complete phase one of his ‘Double Dragon’ experience.

As part of Henley College’s Enterprise & Employability Week, Simon was on hand yesterday to guide the young entrepreneurs in the art of presenting.

The syllabus was based on our proven Presentation OptimisationTM methodology and the students were keen to learn about the importance of message and the mistakes that can be made by over egging the cake (it becomes a floury omelette if you’re wondering).

They also discussed how best to visualise their ideas in a way that will engage the Dragons. The relative merits of PowerPoint, product demos and art boards were all debated along with the opportunities and dangers that using multiple platforms can bring.

The students were very enthusiastic to learn and interestingly they showed the same anxieties that we see every day with our business customers. We know that, to our customers, every presentation is THE presentation and the students felt just the same.

Encouraging the business people of tomorrow to think a little differently about how they present will help them to avoid the pitfalls associated with “Death by PowerPoint” that have given presentations such a bad reputation.

It’s a very Eyeful way of helping to raise the bar for business presentations.

On Friday, Simon will be seeing his work from the other side, as he unfurls his Dragon wings and judges the finalised presentations – we’ll let you know how he gets along.

College