Posts Tagged ‘PowerPoint Design’

Most B2B presentations are failing (and here’s why)…

Thursday, November 13th, 2014 by Jayne Thomas<

The vast majority of B2B presentations are not fit for purpose – scary but true.

Leaving this key sales tool unloved is a sure fire way to miss out on opportunities, damage your reputation and give your competitors the advantage. Ignore your presentation at your peril!

Eyeful’s Simon Morton is here to share some tell-tale signs that you could be missing out on sales as well as giving a few ‘insider secrets’ on turning up the sales power of your presentation.

Not sure if your presentation is fit for purpose? Simply contact us for a chat or download our Sales Enablement Whitepaper.

Innovation In Action – The Presentation Lab Comes To Life

Friday, August 22nd, 2014 by Justine<

As its Friday afternoon and all our UK friends and customers are looking forward to a three day weekend I thought it might be a nice idea to share a little more of our ever popular innovation.

In this little gem Hannah took inspiration from stop motion animation to bring The Presentation Lab book to life.

The result is both captivating and quirky and about as far away from Death By PowerPoint as it is possible to be.

If this doesn’t send you into the weekend with a smile on your face I’ll be very surprised….

To find out more about how our expert designers can bring your presentations to life simply get in touch and we’ll be more than happy to help your presentation realise its full potential.

Innovation in Action – The Eyeful Crowd

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014 by Justine<

It would appear that the recent unveiling of our new innovation page has caused quite a stir.

Aside from quickly becoming one of the most popular pages on our site it’s really started people thinking about exploring the capabilities of PowerPoint.

It’s no secret that we have a huge soft spot for PowerPoint, we’ve tried support groups, cognitive behaviour programmes and aversion therapy, but all to no avail. It’s time to admit that our obsession continues simply because PowerPoint can do such amazing things – in the right hands. Like any tool it’s only as good as the person wielding it and we’ve got some pretty impressive wielders in our midst!

But the secret of what we do goes much deeper, after all visuals only make presentations great when they’re valuable – if they add nothing to the messaging or have no relevance to the audience they’re worse than useless – they’re a distraction.

Having a strong and engaging narrative is so important that even when we’re messing with visuals we’re thinking in stories – which is another reason our innovation page is making such an impact.

There is always a risk involved with letting people see ‘work in progress’  but this is Eyeful and we’ve never been great at keeping great ideas to ourselves. Fortunately for us, it’s becoming apparent that while some of our innovation pieces are very much diamonds in the rough, people are already honing in on their inner sparkle.

On top of that seeing their innovation pieces on the site has also prompted our designers to get even more creative. There’s some really exciting stuff in the pipeline and it’s getting more and more challenging to keep anything at all under our hats.

In fact it’s so hard we’re failing.

So, without further ado, here’s the latest helping of innovation, an animation created by Lorna in PowerPoint and inspired by a comedy classic…

Out With the Old…

Friday, July 11th, 2014 by Justine<

With new web updates on the horizon, we’ve been reflecting over old content and it’s been really interesting to take a close look at some of our old stuff to see how it stands up in today’s presentation landscape.

As we’ve said before new isn’t always better and telling the difference between the next big thing and the latest one hit wonder can be a challenge, but it’s also true that great things wear well.

Fortunately for us it would appear that along the way we have indeed created a few great things (and, thank heavens, nothing bad enough to be hailed as ironically amusing).

Part of what made Eyeful Presentations the game changing company that it is today is that we laid out our aims and specialisms from the beginning and we’ve stuck to our guns.

We’re really rather good at presentations and while we’ve developed how our work can support and inform other parts of a sales collateral suite, we’ve never wavered from our original intent: improving business communication – one presentation at a time.

We’ve also stood by our intention to maximise ROI for our customers and ensure that no repurposing opportunity is left unexplored.

And we’re rather proud of practicing what we preach.

First aired in 2008 and briefly revived in 2012 here’s something from the Eyeful vaults that has stood the test of time much better than my wardrobe – and could even be erring towards retro chic….

 

Wise Words and Valuable Visuals

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014 by Justine<

A while ago we blogged about Winston Churchill and took presentation inspiration from some of his oft quoted gems of wisdom.

There is no doubt that Winston Churchill had the power to inspire and it appears that, 49 years after his death, that power is as strong as ever.

One of our specialist presentation designers decided to pick up the baton and explore how Churchill’s wisdom could be brought to life using our old friend PowerPoint and some carefully chosen visuals.

The result demonstrates perfectly how choosing and using visuals with skill and restraint can make messages more powerful than the words alone.

Avoiding the temptation to ‘over egg the cake’ is key here, the images and transitions are understated and simple; they support rather than overshadow the messaging.

We’ll leave the last words on the subject to the great man himself:

“All the great things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honour, duty, mercy, hope.”

Winston Churchill

From Picasso to Presentations

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 by Justine<

It’s a little while now since I dabbled in art but today the ever informative internet has thrown up another instance where art can help us to understand presentations better.

Scientists have confirmed that Picasso’s The Blue Room is actually painted over an earlier image of a man with a moustache. This is not an unusual phenomenon, many artist did this as part of the creative process and to reuse expensive materials, indeed Picasso’s own Woman Ironing also hides a moustachioed gent (but Picasso’s penchant for hirsute men is not what we’re here for).

While it’s easy to assume that the original image was painted over with something better and was therefore inferior and not worth investigating, it’s important to remember that newer and better are not the same thing.

Fashions change in art as in everything. Anyone who’s ever bought an old house will know that peeling back layers of wallpaper can be a real journey through tastes that time forgot (and then remembered – and then forgot again). Sometimes things are replaced for nothing more than whimsy and in the case of a struggling artist I suspect that hunger or impending homelessness could also be great motivators to produce something more marketable.

Presentations are subject to the same kind of trends and pressures, often with similar results.

First there were the text heavy slides that included every minutia of the information that we wanted to share in painstaking detail. Then bullet points came along, allowing us to dispense with the standard rules for forming coherent sentences without a second thought.

It’s not that long ago that we all got very excited by clipart and merrily inserted images hither and thither, thus making the whole thing prettier.

Then there were transitions, animations, imbedded videos, motion paths – the list goes on and on. As each new thing arrives it is greedily incorporated into presentations and as its star wanes it is replaced.

But somewhere in amongst all this ‘improvement’ is every presentations ‘moustache man’.

He’s been painted over a hundred times but he’s still important because he’s the reason you have a presentation in the first place.

The problem is that as presentations become more and more advanced they can become more and more removed from their purpose. We’ve seen many variations on this over the years and the results vary from the plain ugly (Presentationstein) to the gravely misguided.

While art conservators employ the latest high tech to find out what’s behind the old masters getting to the heart of your presentation will be much easier, all you need to do is look at it through your audiences’ eyes and ask a few simple questions:

Does my presentation have a natural flow or story?
Is all the content relevant and necessary?
Do the visuals support that content effectively?
Is there a clear call to action?

If any one of these things is missing, obscured, or unclear it might well be that it’s been painted over and the result of this can also be demonstrated by art.

Whilst cleaning a 17th century painting of a coastal scene, restorers found a beached whale that had been painted over. While it’s easy to understand that a painting without a dead animal as its focus would be eminently more market friendly, restoring it did explain the ‘hitherto slightly baffling presence of groups of people on the beach, and atop the cliffs, on what appears to be a blustery winter’s day’.

Whether removing, enhancing or replacing content is for the best aesthetically is always going to be a matter of opinion, but when that process interferes with the integrity of your presentation, and prevents it from making sense, you’ve got real problems.

If you’re worried that your presentation message might have got lost along the way, we’ll be more than happy to help you, simply get in touch to find out how.

When Seeing Isn’t Believing…

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014 by Justine<

Most people have a healthy level of scepticism when it comes to statistics; we all know that they can be made to prove just about anything, sometimes by simple omission and sometimes by malevolent manipulation.

We also know that statistics can be a huge snoozefest for audiences; slide after slide of numbers is one of the best ways to disengage an audience and with so many options for graphics available there’s no excuse.

But graphics aren’t a panacea and getting it wrong can cause more than just disinterest.

There are two significant hazards to negotiate when it comes to visualising statistics and either can easily capture the unwary or expose the unscrupulous.

First off there is an old nemesis of ours which involves running fast and loose with the properties of the x and y axis on a graph. Failing to give either axis a scale or making the two scales widely different can lead to some stunning misinformation (there’s an excellent example of this in The Presentation Lab book on page 155, for those of you with a copy to hand).

There’s a huge temptation to use this as a way of making statistics look more impressive than they are, but this is something that presenters do at their peril because, as we may have mentioned before, audiences are not stupid and if they spot a little dishonesty, they’ll expect a big one too.

The second hazard comes from our very human tendency to see patterns where there are none. It happens at a very basic level with shapes; clouds that become sharks, rabbits, or Mick Jagger’s lips for example. And because we’re hard wired to recognise faces from an early age we’re all partial to a bit of pareidolia (and why not, when you can sell a chicken nugget that looks like George Washington for $8000).

We all know that a cloud isn’t a shark and that the nugget isn’t George Washington but it’s hard for us not to see these things.

So, when a graph like this appears before us we immediately see an obvious correlation.

cheese and bedsheets

But look a little closer, do you really think that cheese consumption is relative to death by bedsheets?

The obvious answer (putting aside any notions of fatal cheese dreams) is no.

But as a graphic without supporting information it could be easily misconstrued and our reliance on patterns almost wants us to believe it.

Making data visually appealing is easy, but keeping it honest while you do so can be much harder. Fortunately, our team of specialist presentation consultants and designers is on hand to help you avoid falling victim to dodgy visuals, just get in touch and we’ll be happy to help.

Here Come The Girls

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014 by Justine<

Being one of the best presentation consultancy and design companies is about having the best people and we’re always excited to welcome new talent here at Eyeful Towers.

2014 is turning out to be a big year for us and with new challenges on the horizon our team at Eyeful Towers is growing again.

So without further ado, here are the latest members of the Eyeful family (L to R) Lorna Boyer, Hannah Clarkstone and Harri Kaol.

 

Here come the girls
After initially advertising for one designer to join our in-house team we came across two outstanding candidates and never able to let great talent walk away, we employed then both; Lorna’s background is in graphic design and photography and Hannah is a graduate in Multi-Media Textile design.

Harri has left behind a world of underfloor heating and plumbing to take up the challenge of project management and appears, thankfully, to be suffering from very few u-bend withdrawal symptoms.

We’re really chuffed to have them on our team as we pursue our aim to rid the world of Death by PowerPoint – one presentation at a time….

Eyeful Needs You

Thursday, January 9th, 2014 by Justine<

While most of the world is spending the beginning of 2014 obsessed with slimming down after Christmas excess, here at Eyeful we’re excited about expanding.

Our head office team in Desford is looking for two people to join our eclectic and occasionally eccentric team as we enter one of the most exciting phases of business growth so far.

Our HQ team consists of a delightful bunch of creatives who give their very best to every project and form the hub of a worldwide team that delivers fantastic presentations and outstanding customer service.

We are currently looking to recruit a PowerPoint Presentation Designer and a New Business Generator to join the team and full details of both vacancies can be found here.

So, if you think you’ve got what it takes to be part of a rapidly growing, world leading, specialist presentation team – we want to hear from you.

Eyeful needs you

Eyeful Top Trumps

Monday, December 16th, 2013 by Justine<

Continuing our festive foray into childhood favourites we’ve turned to the inimitable Top Trumps to sift through some Eyeful talent…